Human innovation and enlightenment explained by Physics

 Ephrat Livni reviews, in this Quartz article, the application of Constructal theory to the physical description of innovation and human illumination. Livni article refers to a recent research paper on Social organization by A. Bejan  and other researchers: Social organization: The thermodynamic basis.

Simply put, the theory explains that “this theoretical framework also reveals the physical meaning of innovation: It is a local design change that liberates the flow over the entire territory inhabited by the organized movers”. In brief,  innovations open new pathways that generate opportunity for more movement for everyone around them.

And, as the local invention attract sudden movement, then the whole flowing area, or population, becomes wealthier than before. According to Bejan, “this is the tangible, or physical effect of a single idea, and why research, science, questioning, and tinkering benefit the whole of society”.

Read the full story by Ephrat Livni on Quartz: Physics can explain human innovation and enlightenment, June 30, 2018.

 

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Personal Aircraft: Why The Revolution Won’t Happen

According to Prof. Adrian Bejan views, captured into this article published by Aerospace America, a fundamental law of physics will prevent the Personal Aircraft revolution to happen.

The passenger drones, sky taxis, and other personal aircraft names are buzzing and exciting the aviation industry – but Prof. Bejan explains us that flying is for faster travel over long distances, and not for short distances. In this last case, the economical movement is on land, and it is slower.

Source

 

Design in Nature: the field and its future

These concluding observations presented by Prof. Adrian Bejan, were recorded at the end of the NSF workshop at Villanova University on “Constructal Theory: after 20 Years of Exploration and what the Future Holds”.

This video will guide you  through the decades of development of Constructal theory, since its very inception in Adrian Bejan student’s research work in buckling theory – and his, already, innovative understanding of, and approach to, this field of research.

References

 

Dr. Adrian Bejan: How Cooling Laptops Led to Constructal Theory – video

This video released by the Franklin Institute celebrate Prof. Adrian Bejan’s award by retracing the personal history of Adrian Bejan and the origin and development of his constructal theory:  from small electronics coolong to the explanation of how natural systems branch and flow.

Since 1824 (77 years longer than the Nobel Prizes), The Franklin Institute has been recognizing scientists and engineers – such as Prof. Adrian Bejan – who have changed the world, and our lives.

Cf.  http://fi.edu/awards.

Source

Adrian Bejan: “Everything is evolution“. Credit: The Franklin Institute

 

 

Adrian Bejan to receive 2018 Benjamin Franklin Medal

The Award from the Benjamin Franklin Institute honors the Duke University professor’s development of Constructal theory, which predicts natural design and its evolution in engineering, scientific, and social systems.

Source

Adrian Bejan, the J.A. Jones Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Duke University.

Credit: Duke University

Constructal Theory: What the future holds – NSF Workshop and Franklin Institute Symposium

Two tightly linked events are being organized to celebrate 20 years of research and development of the Constructal Theory – register online to participate and celebrate!

NSF Symposium – “Constructal Theory: After 20 years of exploration and what the future holds”

What the future holds - NSF

This one-and-a-haf-day symposium will bring speakers from both the industry and the academy at the Villanova University, Tuesday and Wednesday the 17th and 18th of April, 2018: Program of the Villanova Workshop.

Online registration and information:

 

 

The Franklin Institute Awards

– “Constructal Theory: What the future holds”

What the future holds - FI Half-day symposium, April 18, 2018, afternoon, as a tribute to the recent Franklin Institute Award granted to Professor Adrian Bejan: Program of the Villanova symposium.

Price: Free and open to the public – registration required. Refreshments will be served.

Register at: https://tinyurl.com/Bejan-Symposium

Contacts: